honorculture

Why We Must Exercise Care In Communicating Honor

I recently sat in a leadership meeting where we watched Jim Collins’ 2010 Global Leadership Summit talk (which on a side note – if you’re not planning on attending this year, change your plans and go!!!).

Mr. Collins spoke about the five stages of decline for organizations, the warning signs, and opportunities to change direction. The concepts were brilliant, and I’d definitely recommend setting aside some time to visit his website and read more on the subject.

The first stage is hubris born of success.

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On Empathy

 

I’ve recently been doing a lot of study on empathy and its impact on building trust, and ultimately, good leadership. Dr. Brené Brown is a research professor at the University of Houston and has spent the past decade studying vulnerability, courage, worthiness, and shame.

In the above video, she outlines empathy as one of the most important ingredients in human connection.

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How to Navigate Your Communications Traffic Jam

In my native land of southern California, traffic is a way of life. In fact, plans are often shaped around the time of day, day of the week, and of course, freeway construction. California may be in the midst of a water shortage, but there are plenty of construction zones to slow traffic every couple miles.

My first job out of college required an hour long commute through a major bottleneck. Many bottlenecks occur when freeways decrease in the number of available lanes. This was a significant issue here, but it also suffered from the ending of a carpool lane. This resulted in cars jockeying for the far left lane in hopes they could pass through the affected area more quickly, which of course, was laughable.

Sometimes the default move in church communications is to bottleneck our promotions too! It’s not difficult to work a last minute announcement into a bulletin, video announcement, or all-church email. The problem is, are you actually getting anything from it? I’ve heard people make the argument that those following a Simple Church model can get away with broad announcements, but that seems a bit nearsighted to me. Awareness of an event, initiative, or product is great, but awareness doesn’t generate action in and of itself.

Are you wanting people to register for your next women’s/men’s event? What about signing up to get more information on serving? We have to target our communication if we want to see people act the way we’re hoping. But where can you begin on a practical level? Keep reading to find out!